Hell is the Suffering of Being Unable to Love

Dostoyevsky

In my humorous tale “Ascension Denied” I depict Hell (or Fo, as it’s called in the book) as a rather hot and dry desert, brimming with slot machines, in a manifested afterlife so far removed from the Source of creation that the essence of its light simply cannot reach that far. The result is a population of dejected, languid and frankly dull dead people.

Whether you accept the medieval Christian view of Hell as a physical place with pits of belching sulfur, or you’d rather contemplate it as a state of mind, it always involves the divorce from that which we understand to be good (from the perspective of the viewer, of course!) Few would argue that love is the one vibration that we all understand to be good, in whatever form it manifests – some see it in their families, some in nature, some in the classic God figure, some in science, and some in themselves.

Can there be a worse hell than love’s opposite? I’m lucky to never have suffered depression, so I can’t relate to the spiritual agony of lovelessness and hopelessness, but I keep in my heart those who have. I imagine if I were to ask someone who has been down that dark and lonely road they would tell me that Hell is the suffering of being unable to love.

If you are able to love, then go out today and love like you never have before! Embrace all of creation, both your loved ones and those strange people that exist outside the universe of your day-to-day. Feel it course through every one of your marvelous, intelligent cells and emanate it out to the corners of reality. Because if being unable to love is Hell, then loving is truly Heaven.

E.A.A Wilson is an author, minister of metaphysics, mom and reluctant bureaucrat. Her comic fantasy novel “Ascension Denied” is set in purgatory but is nonetheless available to the living, now, online, at all major retailers. Stay in touch through:

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