Hell is the Suffering of Being Unable to Love

Dostoyevsky

Dostoyevsky

In my humorous tale “Ascension Denied” I depict Hell (or Fo, as it’s called in the book) as a rather hot and dry desert, brimming with slot machines, in a manifested afterlife so far removed from the Source of creation that the essence of its light simply cannot reach that far. The result is a population of dejected, languid and frankly dull dead people.

Whether you accept the medieval Christian view of Hell as a physical place with pits of belching sulfur, or you’d rather contemplate it as a state of mind, it always involves the divorce from that which we understand to be good (from the perspective of the viewer, of course!) Few would argue that love is the one vibration that we all understand to be good, in whatever form it manifests – some see it in their families, some in nature, some in the classic God figure, some in science, and some in themselves.

Can there be a worse hell than love’s opposite? I’m lucky to never have suffered depression, so I can’t relate to the spiritual agony of lovelessness and hopelessness, but I keep in my heart those who have. I imagine if I were to ask someone who has been down that dark and lonely road they would tell me that Hell is the suffering of being unable to love.

If you are able to love, then go out today and love like you never have before! Embrace all of creation, both your loved ones and those strange people that exist outside the universe of your day-to-day. Feel it course through every one of your marvelous, intelligent cells and emanate it out to the corners of reality. Because if being unable to love is Hell, then loving is truly Heaven.

E.A.A Wilson is an author, minister of metaphysics, mom and reluctant bureaucrat. Her comic fantasy novel “Ascension Denied” is set in purgatory but is nonetheless available to the living, now, online, at all major retailers. Stay in touch through:

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The Dead are the Countrymen of my Future

Koontz

We have this hilarious habit of adapting very quickly to new realities and considering them norm. We reprogram our perspectives so fast. We have more money, stuff, freedom of speech, human liberties and creative expression now than ever before in our history, yet here we are, complaining that we’re just so very poor. In some ways it’s a good thing – I think we’re designed to always yearn for more: it keeps us striving for growth, whether it’s financial, material, personal or spiritual. And on the other hand, we do tend to keep ourselves down in the dumps that way.

This idea was what got me pondering the afterlife in the first place. If there is a life after death, and we turn up there shortly after perishing from some hideous and gruesome demise, how long will it be before we adopt it as the norm and consider it mundane? If the angels built us a purgatorial world where we could recuperate and rest following this shocking life we lead, how long will it be before we fill it with bureaucracy? Taxable incomes? Competing with fellow dead souls for attention in an immortal world where the population is constantly increasing (we certainly haven’t slowed down our death rate). And when life after death is the norm, will we still fear the unknown yet to come? In “Ascension Denied” I created just such a purgatory, where the same fears we have on Earth lead to strange deals and corruption even in the hereafter. I loved writing this – both because it’s side-splittingly funny, and because it reminded me to live like paradise is already here. To live like I’m in Heaven already.

Because it really is true. It’s just a matter of reprogramming our perspective.

E.A.A Wilson is an author, minister of metaphysics, mom and reluctant bureaucrat. Her comic fantasy novel “Ascension Denied” is set in purgatory but is nonetheless available to the living, now, online, at all major retailers. Stay in touch through:

Seeing Death as the End of Life is like…

Searls

Searls

Fellow blogger David Searls puts it beautifully. The horizon simili is so powerful because it reminds us that we’re in the center of our universe. It doesn’t matter that you’re in your little rubber dinghy pumping those oars till your eyeballs pop and your intestines herniate, you’re not going to reach the horizon.

In the same way, up until recently we believed our universe was all there was. We can see pretty far into the past – all the way back till every little piece of matter was squished into a baseball sized blob of density. But there are very few scientists left who believe that the Big Bang was the big beginning. It was just an event horizon. What came before the beginning is still up for speculation.

I believe that just as your little arms will never propel your dinghy far enough to reach the horizon, you can’t reach the end of your existence. Death is just an event horizon – beyond which we’ve got little tangible understanding other than testimony. I’ll probably keep rowing though.

E.A.A Wilson is an author, minister of metaphysics, mom and reluctant bureaucrat. Her comic fantasy novel “Ascension Denied” is set in purgatory but is nonetheless available to the living, now, online, at all major retailers. Stay in touch through: